Review

Noblesse Oblige
Noblesse Oblige

Abstraction can push a familiar scene to the limit of recognizability. Liz Gribin takes similar liberties with the human figure and it’s surroundings in her canvas, ‘Noblesse Oblige,’ which took one of the (Heckscher Museum) show’s top prizes.

Helen HarrisonNew York Times

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[Liz] now aims to convey emotion rather than realism. Her abstract figures often have featureless faces, and she avoids rendering too many details, preferring to let poses and gestures lend her work its emotive quality, which she doesn’t attempt to define.

BostoniaArticle by Midge RaymondSpring 2003

"Thanks to Liz and her diligent and dedicated efforts, fine art was brought to our synagogue house, where it was thoroughly enjoyed by the members of the congregation and the community,"

The Jewish WeekArticle by Jodi Bodner DuBow

In 1985, Gribin had a show at the Isis Gallery in Port Washington, New York, which art critic Malcom Preston reviewed favorably in Newsday. “Color is the most outstanding aspect of Gribin’s pictures - it is original...,” Preston wrote.

Art & AntiquesArticle by Daniel KunitzJanuary 2001
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