Reviews & Articles

[Her figurate paintings] depict models in a modern and somewhat surreal way, allowing the viewer to add any features to the blank areas of the faces in her paintings.

American Style Magazine2010

The figures are emotionally loaded. It's not, however, facial expressions that carry the emotion but their postures and placement in space.

Robert LongEast Hampton Star

This artist's quiet authority is apparent both in person and in her work.

Elaine BensonBridgehampton Gallery Owner

Abstraction can push a familiar scene to the limit of recognizability.

Helen HarrisonNew York Times

“I don’t want to face a white canvas. Sometimes I just pour color on.”

American StyleArticle by Lee LawrenceJune 2006

The manner is casual, the poses of her figures, their attitudes, are almost offhand. It is her skillful drawing that gives us the subject matter.

Malcom PrestonNewsday Art Critic

[Liz] now aims to convey emotion rather than realism. Her abstract figures often have featureless faces, and she avoids rendering too many details, preferring to let poses and gestures lend her work its emotive quality, which she doesn’t attempt to define.

BostoniaArticle by Midge RaymondSpring 2003

Larry Rivers and Liz Gribin, currently exhibiting in Southampton, each exemplify a reverence for a linear approach to the surface of the work that is too often underappreciated ...

Southampton PressArticle by Eric ErnstAugust 2002

"Thanks to Liz and her diligent and dedicated efforts, fine art was brought to our synagogue house, where it was thoroughly enjoyed by the members of the congregation and the community,"

The Jewish WeekArticle by Jodi Bodner DuBow

In 1985, Gribin had a show at the Isis Gallery in Port Washington, New York, which art critic Malcom Preston reviewed favorably in Newsday. “Color is the most outstanding aspect of Gribin’s pictures - it is original...,” Preston wrote.

Art & AntiquesArticle by Daniel KunitzJanuary 2001

Influences include Japanese art, which Gribin was drawn to during her tenure at Boston University, Matisse for his use of color, drawings by Picasso, and Californian artist Richard Diebenkorn.

The IndependentArticle by Kathryn Georgette

"What I responded to in Liz's work," Leitzes says, "is the juxtaposition between sadness and beauty. There's a real emotion beneath the surface."

Boston GlobeArticle by Tina SuttonAugust 12, 2007

“It’s not so much reproducing what I see,” Gribin said, explaining her painting style. “It’s the body language or the gesture of the model that I’m trying to capture.”

Needham TimesArticle by Jonathan DameMay 1, 2015

She creates a poetic atmosphere and a sensitive and refreshing rendering of the figure which is rare today.

Will BarnetNew York CityMarch 15, 2004